Manual Chapter : Common Elements for Monitors Tasks

Applies To:

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BIG-IP DNS

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP AFM

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP Analytics

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP PEM

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP ASM

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP AAM

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP APM

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0

BIG-IP LTM

  • 14.1.0, 14.0.0
Manual Chapter

Common Elements for Monitors Tasks

  1. On the Main tab, click
    DNS
    GSLB
    Monitors
    .
    The Monitor List screen opens.
  2. On the Main tab, click
    Local Traffic
    Monitors
    .
    The Monitors List screen opens.
  3. On the Main tab, click
    DNS
    Delivery
    Load Balancing
    Monitors
    .
    The Monitor List screen opens.
  4. On the Main tab, click
    DNS
    Delivery
    Load Balancing
    Monitors
    or
    Local Traffic
    Monitors
    .
    The Monitor List screen opens.
  5. On the Main tab, click
    Local Traffic
    Nodes
    .
    The Node List screen opens.
  6. Click
    Create
    .
    The New Monitor screen opens.
  7. Click
    Finished
    .
  8. In the
    Name
    field, type a name for the monitor.
  9. Type a name for the monitor.
    Monitor names are limited to 63 characters.
  10. From the
    Type
    list, select the type of monitor.
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the monitor type.
  11. From the
    Type
    list, select
    Inband
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    Inband
    monitor type.
  12. From the
    Type
    list, select
    SIP
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    SIP
    monitor type.
  13. From the
    Type
    list, select
    Diameter
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    Diameter
    monitor type.
  14. From the
    Type
    list, select
    HTTP
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    HTTP
    monitor type.
  15. From the
    Type
    list, select
    FTP
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    FTP
    monitor type.
  16. From the
    Type
    list, select
    HTTPS
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    HTTPS
    monitor type.
  17. From the
    Type
    list, select
    MQTT
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the
    MQTT
    monitor type.
  18. From the
    Type
    list, select one of these options:
    SNMP DCA
    Use this monitor to specify new values for CPU, memory, and disk metrics.
    SNMP DCA Base
    Use this monitor to specify values for metrics other than CPU, memory, and disk usage.
  19. From the
    Type
    list, select
    SNMP
    .
  20. From the
    Type
    list, select
    DNS
    .
  21. From the
    Type
    list, select
    GTP
    .
  22. From the
    Type
    list, select
    MSSQL
    .
  23. From the
    Type
    list, select
    SASP
    .
    The screen refreshes, and displays the configuration options for the SASP monitor type.
  24. From the
    Import Monitor
    list, select an existing monitor.
    The new monitor inherits initial configuration values from the existing monitor.
  25. From the
    Parent Monitor
    list, select an existing monitor.
    The new monitor inherits initial configuration values from the existing monitor.
  26. From the
    Parent Monitor
    list, select
    http
    .
    The new monitor inherits initial configuration values from the existing monitor.
  27. From the
    Configuration
    list, select
    Advanced
    .
    This selection makes it possible for you to modify additional default settings.
  28. Configure all settings shown.
  29. Configure additional settings based on your network requirements.
  30. Select the
    Select
    check box for the monitor that you want to delete.
  31. Click
    Enable
    .
  32. Click
    Disable
    .
  33. Click
    Delete
    .
    A confirmation message appears.
  34. Click
    Delete
    .
  35. In the
    Interval
    field type a number that indicates, in seconds, how frequently the system issues the monitor check. The default is
    5
    seconds.
    The frequency of a monitor check must be greater than the value of the global-level
    Heartbeat Interval
    setting. Otherwise, the monitor can acquire out-of-date data.
  36. In the
    Interval
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how frequently the system issues the monitor check. The default is
    10
    seconds.
    The frequency of a monitor check must be greater than the value of the global-level
    Heartbeat Interval
    setting. Otherwise, the monitor can acquire out-of-date data.
  37. In the
    Interval
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how frequently the system issues the monitor check. The default is
    15
    seconds.
    The frequency of a monitor check must be greater than the value of the global-level
    Heartbeat Interval
    setting. Otherwise, the monitor can acquire out-of-date data.
  38. In the
    Interval
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how frequently the system issues the monitor check. The default is
    30
    seconds.
    The frequency of a monitor check must be greater than the value of the global-level
    Heartbeat Interval
    setting. Otherwise, the monitor can acquire out-of-date data.
  39. In the
    Interval
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how frequently the system issues the monitor check. The default is
    90
    seconds.
    The frequency of a monitor check must be greater than the value of the global-level
    Heartbeat Interval
    setting.
  40. In the Configuration area, from the
    GWM Interval
    list, select one of these options:
    Automatic
    (default)
    The system uses the interval setting recommended by the Group Workload Manager (GWM).
    Specify
    Specifies the interval the system uses to query the GWM. Type a number between 10 and 600 seconds.
  41. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    16
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  42. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    30
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  43. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    30
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  44. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    31
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  45. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    90
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  46. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    91
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  47. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    120
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  48. In the
    Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates, in seconds, how much time the target has to respond to the monitor check. The default is
    180
    seconds.
    If the target responds within the allotted time period, it is considered up. If the target does not respond within the time period, it is considered down.
  49. In the
    Probe Timeout
    field, type a number that indicates the number of seconds after which the system times out the probe request to the system. The default is
    5
    seconds.
  50. In the
    Probe Interval
    field, type a number that indicates the number of seconds between the probes sent by the system. The default is
    1
    second.
  51. In the
    Probe Attempts
    field, type a number that indicates the number of probes the system sends before marking the resource down. The default is
    3
    attempts.
  52. In the
    Protocol Version
    field, type a number that indicates the version of the GTP protocol the system uses. The default is
    1
    .
  53. For the
    Ignore Down Response
    setting, do one of the following:
    • Accept the
      No
      default option.
    • Select the
      Yes
      option to specify that the monitor accepts more than one probe attempt per interval.
  54. In the
    Path/Filename
    field, type the full path and file name of the file that the system attempts to download.
    The health check is successful if the system can download the file.
  55. For the
    Mode
    setting, select one of the following data transfer process (DTP) modes.
    Passive
    The monitor sends a data transfer request to the FTP server. When the FTP server receives the request, the FTP server initiates and establishes the data connection.
    Port
    The monitor initiates and establishes the data connection with the FTP server.
  56. For the
    Up Interval
    setting, specify whether to use the up interval:
    • If you do not want to use the up interval, Retain the default,
      Disabled
      .
    • To use the up interval, select
      Enabled
      , and specify how often you want the system to verify the health of a resource that is up.
  57. In the
    Time Until Up
    field, type a number that indicates the number of seconds to wait after a resource first responds correctly to the monitor before setting the resource to up.
    The default value is
    0
    (zero), which disables this option.
  58. For
    Manual Resume
    , specify whether the system automatically enables the monitored resource when the monitor check is successful.
    This setting applies only when the monitored resource has failed to respond to a monitor check.
    Yes
    The system does nothing when the monitor check succeeds, and you must manually enable the monitored resource.
    No
    The system automatically re-enables the monitored resource after the next successful monitor check.
  59. Click a monitor name in the list.
    The monitor's properties screen opens, showing the monitor's settings and values.
  60. Select the
    Adaptive
    check box.
    Additional settings display.
  61. From the
    Allowed Divergence
    list, select one of these options:
    Absolute
    Type the number of milliseconds that the latency of a monitor probe can exceed the mean latency for the service being probed.
    Relative
    Type the percentage deviation that the latency of a monitor probe can exceed the mean latency for the service being probed.
  62. From the
    Allowed Divergence
    list, select
    Absolute
    , and then type the number of milliseconds that the latency of a monitor probe can exceed the mean latency of a monitor probe for the service being probed.
  63. From the
    Allowed Divergence
    list, select
    Relative
    , and then type percentage of deviation that the latency of a monitor probe can exceed the mean latency of a monitor probe for the service being probed.
  64. In the
    Adaptive Limit
    field, type the maximum length of a monitor probe (in milliseconds), regardless of the calculated mean for the service being monitored.
  65. In the
    Sampling Timespan
    field, type the length (in seconds) of the probe history span that the system uses to calculate the mean latency and standard deviation of a monitor probe.
  66. Click
    Instances
    on the menu bar.
    The screen displays any existing monitor instances.
  67. Select the
    Select
    check box for the instance you want to manage.
  68. In the
    Send String
    field, type a text string that the monitor sends to the target resource.
    The default string is
    GET /
    . This string retrieves a default file from the web site.
    Type a fully qualified path name, for example,
    GET /www/example/index.html
    , if you want to retrieve a specific web site page.
  69. Type a SQL statement in the
    Send String
    field that the monitor sends to the database server to verify availability.
    This is an example of a basic Send String:
    SELECT Firstname, LastName FROM Person.Person WHERE LastName = 'name'
    . This is an example of a Send String that determines which database is primary:
    SELECT role_desc,is_local,synchronization_health_desc FROM sys.dm_hadr_availability_replica_states WHERE is_local = 1 AND synchronization_health_desc = 'HEALTHY';
    Based on the string you enter, you may need to enter values in other fields for this monitor.
  70. In the
    Send String
    field, type a text string that the monitor sends to the target resource.
    The default string is
    GET /\r\n
    . This string retrieves a default file from the web site.
    Send string syntax depends upon the HTTP version. Please observe the following conventions.
    Version
    Convention
    HTTP 0.9
    "GET /\n"
    or
    "GET /\r\n"
    .
    HTTP 1.0
    "GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n"
    or
    "GET / HTTP/1.0\n\n"
    HTTP 1.1
    "GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: server.com\r\n\r\n"
    or
    "GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: server.com\r\nConnection: close\r\n\r\n"
    Type a fully qualified path name, for example,
    "GET /www/example/index.html\r\n"
    , if you want to retrieve a specific web site page.
  71. In the
    Receive String
    field, type a regular expression that represents the text string that the monitor looks for in the returned resource.
    The most common receive expressions contain a text string that is included in an HTML file on your site. The text string can be regular text, HTML tags, or image names.
    If you do not specify both a send string and a receive string, the monitor performs a simple service check and connect only.
  72. In the
    Receive Disable String
    field, type a regular expression that represents the text string that the monitor looks for in the returned resource.
    Use a
    Receive String
    value together with a
    Receive Disable String
    value to match the value of a response from the origin web server and create one of three states for a pool member or node:
    Up (Enabled)
    , when only
    Receive String
    matches the response, or when both
    Receive String
    and
    Receive Disable String
    match the response;
    Up (Disabled)
    , when only
    Receive Disable String
    matches the response; or
    Down
    , when neither
    Receive String
    nor
    Receive Disable String
    matches the response.
    If you choose to set the
    Reverse
    setting to
    Yes
    , the monitor marks the pool, pool member, or node
    Down
    when the test is successful.
  73. Type a list of ciphers in the
    Cipher List
    field that match those of the client sending a request, or of the server sending a response.
    The default string is
    DEFAULT:+SHA:+3DES:+kEDH
    .
  74. Type a name in the
    User Name
    field.
  75. In the
    User Name
    field, type the name the monitor uses to access the database server.
  76. Type a password in the
    Password
    field.
  77. In the
    Password
    field, type the password the monitor uses to access the database server.
  78. From the
    Compatibility
    list, do one of the following:
    • Accept the default,
      Enabled
      , to set the SSL options setting in OpenSSL to
      ALL
      .
    • Select
      Disabled
      to specify SSL options.
  79. From the
    Client Certificate
    list, do one of the following:
    • Accept the default,
      None
      , to specify no client certificate.
    • Select
      ca-bundle
      to use the ca-bundle client certificate.
    • Select
      default
      to use a default client certificate.
  80. From the
    Client Key
    list, specify whether to use a client key:
    • Accept the default,
      None
      , to specify no client key.
    • Select
      default
      to use a default client key.
  81. For the
    Reverse
    setting, specify whether you want the system to work in reverse mode:
    • If you want the system to work normally, retain the
      No
      default option.
    • If you want the system to mark the pool, pool member, or node
      Down
      when the test is successful, select the
      Yes
      option.
  82. For the
    Transparent
    setting, specify whether you want the monitor to operate in transparent mode:
    • If not, accept the
      No
      default option.
    • To use a path through the associated pool members or nodes to monitor the aliased destination, select the
      Yes
      option.
  83. For the
    Alias Address
    setting, specify an alias IP address:
    • Retain the
      *All Addresses
      default option.
    • Type an alias IP address for the monitor to verify, on behalf of the pools or pool members with which the monitor is associated.
    If the health check for the alias address is successful, the system marks all associated objects
    up
    . If the health check for the alias address is not successful, then the system marks all associated objects
    down
    .
  84. For the
    Alias Service Port
    setting, specify an alias port or service for the monitor to check:
    • Accept the
      *All Ports
      default option.
    • Select an alias port or service for the monitor to check, on behalf of the pools or pool members with which the monitor is associated.
    If the health check for the alias port or service is successful, the system marks all associated objects up. If the health check for the alias port or service is not successful, then the system marks all associated objects down.
  85. For the
    Debug
    setting, specify whether you want the system to collect and publish additional information and error messages for this monitor.
    You can use the log information to help diagnose and troubleshoot unsuccessful health checks. To view the log entries, see the
    System
    Logs
    screens.
    Yes
    The system redirects error messages and other information to a log file created specifically for this monitor.
    No
    The system does not collect additional information or error messages related to this monitor. This is the default setting.
  86. In the
    Query Name
    field, type the domain name that you want the monitor to query.
    For the zone,
    siterequest.com
    , you might want the monitor to query for
    www.siterequest.com
    .
  87. Click
    Update
    .
  88. From the
    GWM Protocol
    list, select the communications protocol the SASP monitor uses. The default is TCP.
  89. From the
    Mode
    list, select one of the following:
    Push
    (default)
    The Group Workload Manager (GWM) decides on the interval to send Get Weights requests and the SASP monitor listens for messages.
    Pull
    The SASP monitor uses the GWM interval value to send the Get Weights requests to the workload manager.
  90. For the
    GWM Primary Address
    setting, type the IP address of the Enterprise Workload Manager (formerly Gateway Workload Manager).
  91. For the
    GWM Secondary Address
    setting, type the IP address of the backup Enterprise Workload Manager server (assuming there is a backup server).
  92. For the
    GWM Service Port
    setting, type the number of the port through which the SASP monitor communicates with the Enterprise Workload Manager. The default is
    3860
    .
  93. From the
    GWM Protocol
    list, select the communications protocol the SASP monitor uses. The default is
    TCP
    .
  94. From the
    SSL Profile
    list, select an option for the profile:
    • To specify no SSL profile, accept the default,
      None
      .
    • To use a profile, select an SSL Profile from the list of the available
      serverssl
      profiles in the BIG-IP system.
  95. On the menu bar, click
    Test
    .
    The monitor's test settings display as available for configuring, and screen shows the results of the last test of the monitor, if any. The results persist until either you restart the BIG-IP system, or a new test is run.
  96. On the menu bar, click
    Test
    .
    The monitor's test settings display as available for configuring, and the screen shows the results of the last test of the monitor, if any.
    The results persist until either you restart the BIG-IP system, or a new test is run.
  97. Type the address and port of the monitor configuration you want to test in the
    Address
    fields.
    If either the address or port are already configured for the health monitor itself, the
    Address
    field will be pre-populated with these parameters and you cannot configure them. The
    Address
    field parameters cannot match an existing node or pool member that is already running the monitor being tested.
    Once the required
    Address
    field parameters are provided, the
    Test
    button is available to click to start a test.
  98. Click the
    Test
    button.
    When the test is running, if you want to cancel, click the
    Cancel
    button.
    Test results display in the
    Results
    field.