Manual Chapter : About NATs

Applies To:

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BIG-IP AAM

  • 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP APM

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP Analytics

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP Link Controller

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP LTM

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP PEM

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP AFM

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP DNS

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0

BIG-IP ASM

  • 17.0.0, 16.1.3, 16.1.2, 16.1.1, 16.1.0, 16.0.1, 16.0.0, 15.1.7, 15.1.6, 15.1.5, 15.1.4, 15.1.3, 15.1.2, 15.1.1, 15.1.0, 15.0.1, 15.0.0, 14.1.5, 14.1.4, 14.1.3, 14.1.2, 14.1.0
Manual Chapter

About NATs

In some cases, you might want to allow a client on an external network to send a request directly to a specific internal node (thus bypassing the normal load balancing server selection). To send a request directly to an internal server, a client normally needs to know the internal node’s IP address, which is typically a private class IP address. Because private class IP addresses are non-routable, you can instead create a network translation address (NAT). A
NAT
is a feature of BIG-IP Local Traffic Manager that provides a routable IP address that an external node can use to send traffic to, or receive traffic from, an internal node.
More specifically, a NAT is an address translation object that instructs Local Traffic Manager (LTM) to translate one IP address in a packet header to another IP address. A NAT consists of a one-to-one mapping of a public IP address to an internal private class IP address.
You can use a NAT in two different ways:
To translate a private class destination address to a public address
When an external node sends traffic to the public IP address defined in a NAT, Local Traffic Manager automatically translates that destination address to the associated private class IP address, which represents a specific node on the internal network. This translation is hidden from the external node that sent the traffic.
To translate a private class source address to a public address
You can also use a NAT to translate an internal node’s private class source IP address to a public IP address. This translation is hidden from the external node that receives the traffic.
To summarize, a NAT provides a routable address for sending packets to or from a node that has a private class IP address.
When you create a NAT, you can map only one private class IP address to a specific public IP address. That is, a NAT always represents a one-to-one mapping between a private class IP address and a public IP address. If you want to map more than one private class IP address (that is, multiple internal nodes) to a single public IP address, you can create a SNAT instead.
NATs do not support port translation, and are not appropriate for protocols that embed IP addresses in the packet, such as FTP.
When you use a NAT to provide access to an internal node, all ports on that internal node are open. To mitigate this security risk, consider using a SNAT instead.
Local Traffic Manager can apply a NAT to either an inbound or an outbound connection.