Manual Chapter : Configuring Network Virtualization Tunnels

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Manual Chapter

Configuring Network Virtualization Tunnels

Overview: Configuring network virtualization tunnels

Large data centers and cloud service providers are benefiting from large scale network virtualization. Network Virtualization provides connectivity in cloud environments by overlaying Layer 2 segments over a Layer 3 infrastructure. The overlay network can be dynamically extended with multiple virtualized networks without affecting the Layer 3 infrastructure. This number of virtualized networks is typically much larger than the number of VLANS the infrastructure can support.
You can configure a BIG-IP® system to function as a gateway in a virtualized network, bridging the data center virtualized networks with the physical network (L2 gateway), or performing routing and higher L4-L7 functionality among virtual networks of different types (L3 gateway). Connecting these networks allows for expansion, and provides a mechanism to streamline the transition of data centers into a virtualized model, while maintaining connectivity.
This illustration shows the BIG-IP system as a network virtualization gateway.
The BIG-IP system as a network virtualization gateway
BIG-IP system as a network virtualization gateway
In a virtualized network, the BIG-IP system needs to learn about other virtualization tunnel endpoints. Each hypervisor has a tunnel endpoint. The hypervisor needs to locate the virtual machines it manages, by maintaining a form of the L2 location records, typically, IP addresses and MAC addresses, virtual network identifiers, and virtual tunnel endpoints.

About network virtualization tunnels on the BIG-IP system

When you configure a BIG-IP® system as a network virtualization gateway, the system represents the connection as a tunnel, which provides a Layer 2 interface on the virtual network. You can use the tunnel interface in both Layer 2 and Layer 3 configurations. After you create the network virtualization tunnels, you can use the tunnels like you use VLANs on a BIG-IP system, such as for routing, assigning self IP addresses, and associating with virtual servers.

Creating a network virtualization tunnel

Creating a network virtualization tunnel on a BIG-IP system provides an L2 gateway to connect the physical underlay network with a virtual overlay network.
  1. On the Main tab, click
    Network
    Tunnels
    Tunnel List
    Create
    or
    Carrier Grade NAT
    Tunnels
    Create
    .
    The New Tunnel screen opens.
  2. In the
    Name
    field, type a unique name for the tunnel.
  3. From the
    Profile
    list, select the tunnel profile you created for network virtualization.
    This selection must be a profile based on either the
    gre
    or
    vxlan
    parent profile, depending on your virtualized network environment.
  4. In the
    Local Address
    field, type the self IP address of the VLAN through which the remote hypervisor is reachable.
  5. For the
    Remote Address
    list, retain the default selection,
    Any
    .
  6. In the
    Key
    field, type the VNI (Virtual Network Identifier) to use for a VXLAN tunnel or the Virtual Subnet Identifier (VSID) to use for a NVGRE tunnel.
    This field appears above the
    Profile
    field when you select a profile that requires this setting.
  7. Click
    Finished
    .
This tunnel is now available to use in virtualized network routing configurations, depending on how you configure your network.

Virtualized network terminology

These terms are associated with virtualized networks.
forwarding database (FDB)
The
FDB
is the database that contains mappings between the MAC address of each virtual machine and the IP address of the hypervisor machine on which it resides.
L2 gateway
The Layer 2 gateway performs the bridge functionality between VLAN and virtual segments in a virtualized network.
L3 gateway
The Layer 3 gateway performs routing and higher L4-L7 functionality among virtualized network segments of different types.
overlay network
The
overlay network
is a virtual network of VMs built on top of a stable L2-L3 structure. The view from one VM to another is as if they were on the same switch, but, in fact, they could be far afield.
tunnel endpoint
A
tunnel endpoint
originates or terminates a tunnel. In a virtualized network environment, the tunnel IP addresses are part of the L2 underlay network. The same local IP address can be used for multiple tunnels.
underlay network
The
underlay network
is the L2 or L3 routed physical network, a mesh of tunnels.
virtualized network
A
virtualized network
is when you create a virtual L2 or L3 topology on top of a stable physical L2 or L3 network. Connectivity in the virtual topology is provided by tunneling Ethernet frames in IP over the physical network.
VNI
The Virtual Network Identifier (VNI)
is also called the VXLAN segment ID. The system uses the VNI to identify the appropriate tunnel.
VSID
The Virtual Subnet Identifier (VSID)
is a 24-bit identifier used in an NVGRE environment that represents a virtual L2 broadcast domain, enabling routes to be configured between virtual subnets.
VTEP
The
VXLAN Tunnel Endpoint (VTEP)
originates or terminates a VXLAN tunnel. The same local IP address can be used for multiple tunnels.
VXLAN
Virtual eXtended LAN (VXLAN)
is a network virtualization scheme that overlays Layer 2 over Layer 3. VLXAN uses Layer 3 multicast to support the transmission of multicast and broadcast traffic in the virtual network, while decoupling the virtualized network from the physical infrastructure.
VXLAN gateway
A
VXLAN gateway
bridges traffic between VXLAN and non-VXLAN environments. The BIG-IP® system uses a VXLAN gateway to bridge a traditional VLAN and a VXLAN network, by becoming a network virtualization endpoint.
VXLAN header
In addition to the UDP header, encapsulated packets include a
VXLAN header
, which carries a 24-bit VNI to uniquely identify Layer 2 segments within the overlay.
VXLAN segment
A
VXLAN segment
is a Layer 2 overlay network over which VMs communicate. Only VMs within the same VXLAN segment can communicate with each other.

Centralized vs. decentralized models of network virtualization

Using the BIG-IP® system as a network virtualization gateway, you can set up virtualized network segments using either a centralized or decentralized model.

Centralized model

In a centralized model, a network orchestrator or controller manages the virtualized network segments. The orchestrator has full view of VTEPs, L2, and L3 information in the overlay, and is responsible for pushing this information to hypervisors and gateways. Microsoft Hyper-V and VMware NSX environments use this model.
Centralized model of network virtualization
Centralized model of network virtualization

Decentralized model

A decentralized model of network virtualization does not require a network orchestrator or controller. In this model, the router learns the tunnel endpoint and MAC address locations by flooding broadcast, multicast, and unknown destination frames over IP multicast. VMware vSphere 5.1 environments use this model.
Decentralized model of network virtualization
Decentralized model of network virtualization

About network virtualization tunnel types

The BIG-IP® system supports multiple network virtualization tunnel types. You can even combine virtualized network segments based on different tunnel types. This table offers a quick comparison of the tunnel types.
VXLAN (Multicast)
VXLAN (Unicast)
NVGRE
Transparent Ethernet Bridging
Decentralized
Centralized
Centralized
Centralized
VMware vSphere 5.1
VMware NSX
Microsoft SCVMM/Hyper-V
OpenStack
VXLAN UDP Encapsulation
VXLAN UDP Encapsulation
GRE-based Encapsulation
GRE-based Encapsulation
24-bit ID
24-bit ID
24-bit ID
32-bit ID
Endpoints discovered dynamically
Endpoints statically configured
Endpoints statically configured
Endpoints statically configured
Floods unknown and broadcast frames using IP multicast.
Can flood using unicast replication.
Does not flood (completely static).
Floods using unicast replication.
In addition to the above types of tunnels, the BIG-IP system supports the creation of Geneve Network Virtualization tunnels. Like VXLAN, Geneve tunnels support multicast and multipoint flooding.
IPv4 multicast addresses in the local network control block (224.0.0/24) [RFC 5771] should not be used for configuring the remote address of the VXLAN/Geneve tunnels with multicast flooding.

About statically configured network virtualization tunnels

For the centralized model, you can use VXLAN (Unicast), NVGRE, or Transparent Ethernet Bridging, depending on the cloud environment. Using an agent or plug-in, or the
tmsh
command-line utility, you can statically configure the FDB and ARP forwarding table entries. Using the
tmsh
command-line utility or browser interface, you can create the network virtualization tunnels, which are managed by the network controller.

Considerations for statically configured network virtualization tunnels

As you configure a BIG-IP® system to be an L2 or L3 gateway for statically configured network virtualization tunnels, keep these considerations in mind.
  • The BIG-IP system must be licensed for SDN Services.
  • If you have over 2000 tunnels, set the
    Management (MGMT)
    setting on the Resource Provisioning screen is to
    Large
    (
    System
    Resource Provisioning
    ).

Examples for manually populating L2 location records

Using the
tmsh
command-line utility, you can add static FDB records and ARP entries for each virtual tunnel endpoint.
  • Add static FDB (forwarding database) entries to associate MAC addresses with specified tunnel endpoints. For example, the following command creates an FDB entry that associates the MAC address
    00:01:02:03:04:05
    with the tunnel endpoint
    10.1.1.1
    of the tunnel
    vxlan0
    .
    # tmsh modify net fdb tunnel vxlan0 records add { 00:01:02:03:04:05 { endpoint 10.1.1.1 } }
  • Delete a MAC address from an FDB entry.
    # tmsh modify net fdb tunnel vxlan0 records delete { 00:01:02:03:04:05 }
  • Delete a static ARP.
    # tmsh delete net arp 10.3.3.1
  • Add an IP address to a MAC address in the ARP table.
    # tmsh create net arp 10.3.3.1 { ip-address 10.3.3.1 mac-address 00:01:02:03:04:05 }
Using the iControl/REST API, you can program a network controller to build and maintain network virtualization tunnels. This example adds an entry to the FDB table that associates the MAC address
00:01:02:03:04:05
with the tunnel endpoint
10.1.1.2
of the tunnel
vxlan0-tunnel
.
$ curl -u admin:f5site02 -H "Content-Type:=application/json" -k -X PUT 'https://172.30.69.69/mgmt/tm/net/fdb/tunnel/~Common~vxlan0-tunnel' -d '{"kind":"tm:net:fdb:tunnel:tunnelstate","name":"vxlan0-tunnel","partition":"Common", "fullPath":"/Common/vxlan0-tunnel","generation":1, "selfLink":"https://localhost/mgmt/tm/net/fdb/tunnel/~Common~vxlan0-tunnel? ver=11.5.0","records":[{"name":"00:01:02:03:04:05", "endpoint":"10.1.1.2"}]}' |python -m json.tool { "fullPath": "/Common/vxlan0-tunnel", "generation": 1, "kind": "tm:net:fdb:tunnel:tunnelstate", "name": "vxlan0-tunnel", "partition": "Common", "records": [ { "endpoint": "10.1.1.2", "name": "00:01:02:03:04:05" } ], "selfLink": "https://localhost/mgmt/tm/net/fdb/tunnel/~Common~vxlan0-tunnel?ver=11.5.0" }

Commands for manually configuring FDB records of type "endpoints"

You can use the tunnel forwarding database (FDB) record type known as
endpoints
to configure a set of remote endpoints. The remote endpoints are used to send unknown destination, multicast, and broadcast frames. The MAC address for any
endpoints
record must be
ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff
.
The following commands show how to use the Traffic Management Shell (
tmsh
) to create and delete a record of endpoints.
Create a record of endpoints:
tmsh modify net fdb tunnel
tunnel_name
records add { ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff { endpoints add {
IP_addresses
} } }
Delete a record of endpoints:
tmsh modify net fdb tunnel
tunnel_name
records delete { ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff }

Sample NVGRE configuration using tmsh

This listing example illustrates the steps for creating a routing configuration that includes an NVGRE tunnel on the BIG-IP® system. F5 Networks provides an API for you to configure the F5 SCVMM Gateway Provider plug-in to build and manage NVGRE tunnels.
create net vlan wan { interfaces add { 1.1 } mtu 1550 } create net self 10.1.1.1/24 { address 10.1.1.1/24 vlan wan } create net tunnels gre nvgre { encapsulation nvgre } create net tunnels tunnel nvgre5000 { local-address 10.1.1.1 remote-address any profile nvgre key 5000 } create net vlan legacy5000 { interfaces add { 2.1 } } create net route-domain 5000 { id 5000 vlans add { nvgre5000 legacy5000 } } create net self 10.3.3.1%5000/24 { address 10.3.3.1%5000/24 vlan nvgre5000 } create net self 10.4.4.1%5000/24 { address 10.4.4.1%5000/24 vlan legacy5000 } create net route 10.5.5.0%5000/24 { network 10.5.5.0%5000/24 gw 10.3.3.2%5000 } create net route 10.6.6.0%5000/24 { network 10.6.6.0%5000/24 gw 10.3.3.3%5000 } modify net fdb tunnel nvgre5000 { records add { 00:FF:0A:03:03:02 { endpoint 10.1.1.2 } 00:FF:0A:03:03:03 { endpoint 10.1.1.3 } } } create net arp 10.3.3.2%5000 { mac-address 00:FF:0A:03:03:02 } create net arp 10.3.3.3%5000 { mac-address 00:FF:0A:03:03:03 }

Sample VXLAN unicast configuration using tmsh

This example listing illustrates the steps for creating a routing configuration that includes a VXLAN tunnel on the BIG-IP® system. This configuration adds the tunnel to a route domain. You can use the iControl/REST API to configure a network controller to build and manage VXLAN (unicast) tunnels.
create net vlan wan { interfaces add { 1.1 } mtu 1550 } create net self 10.1.1.1/24 { address 10.1.1.1/24 vlan wan } create net tunnels vxlan vxlan-static { flooding-type none } create net tunnels tunnel vxlan5000 { local-address 10.1.1.1 remote-address any profile vxlan-static key 5000 } create net vlan legacy5000 { interfaces add { 2.1 } } create net route-domain 5000 { id 5000 vlans add {vxlan5000 legacy5000 } } create net self 10.3.3.1%5000/24 { address 10.3.3.1%5000/24 vlan vxlan5000 } create net self 10.4.4.1%5000/24 { address 10.4.4.1%5000/24 vlan legacy5000 } create net route 10.5.5.0%5000/24 { network 10.5.5.0%5000/24 gw 10.3.3.2%5000 } create net route 10.6.6.0%5000/24 { network 10.6.6.0%5000/24 gw 10.3.3.3%5000 } modify net fdb tunnel vxlan5000 { records add { 00:FF:0A:03:03:02 { endpoint 10.1.1.2 } 00:FF:0A:03:03:03 { endpoint 10.1.1.3 } } } create net arp 10.3.3.2%5000 { mac-address 00:FF:0A:03:03:02 } create net arp 10.3.3.3%5000 { mac-address 00:FF:0A:03:03:03 }

Sample command for virtual server to listen on a VXLAN tunnel

An alternative for including a network virtualization tunnel in a routing configuration is to create a virtual server that listens for the tunnel traffic, such as in the following example.
# tmsh create ltm virtual http_virtual destination 10.3.3.15%5000:http ip-protocol tcp vlans add { vxlan5000 }
The code in this example creates a virtual server
http_virtual
that listens for traffic destined for the IP address
10.3.3.15
on the tunnel named
vxlan5000
.

Commands for viewing tunnel statistics

You can use the
tmsh
command-line utility to view tunnel statistics, listing either all the tunnels on the BIG-IP® system or statistics about a particular tunnel.
View per-tunnel statistics:
# tmsh show net tunnels tunnel
View static and dynamic FDB entries:
# tmsh show net fdb tunnel

About VXLAN multicast configuration

In a VMware vSphere 5.1 environment, you can configure VXLAN without knowing all the remote tunnel endpoints. The BIG-IP® system uses multicast flooding to learn unknown and broadcast frames. VXLAN can extend the virtual network across a set of hypervisors, providing L2 connectivity among the hosted virtual machines (VMs). Each hypervisor represents a VXLAN tunnel endpoint (VTEP). In this environment, you can configure a BIG-IP system as an L2 VXLAN gateway device to terminate the VXLAN tunnel and forward traffic to and from a physical network.

About bridging VLAN and VXLAN networks

You can configure Virtual eXtended LAN (VXLAN) on a BIG-IP® system to enable a physical VLAN to communicate with virtual machines (VMs) in a virtual network.
The VXLAN gateway
The VXLAN gateway
When you configure a BIG-IP system as an L2 VXLAN gateway, the BIG-IP system joins the configured multicast group, and can forward both unicast and multicast or broadcast frames on the virtual network. The BIG-IP system learns about MAC address and VTEP associations dynamically, thus avoiding unnecessary transmission of multicast traffic.
Multiple VXLAN tunnels
Multiple VXLAN tunnels

Considerations for configuring multicast VXLAN tunnels

As you configure VXLAN on a BIG-IP® system, keep these considerations in mind.
  • If you configure the BIG-IP device as a bridge between physical VLANs and a VXLAN tunnel, the number of virtualized network segments in the overlay is limited to the maximum number of physical VLANs (4094). This limitation does not apply to Layer 3 configurations.
  • You need to configure a separate tunnel for each VNI. The tunnels can have the same local and remote endpoint addresses.
  • For the Layer 2 network, you must ensure a loop-free topology.
  • Do not modify the configuration of a VXLAN tunnel after it is created. Instead, delete the existing tunnel and create a new one.

Modifying a VLAN for disaggregation of VXLAN tunnel traffic

You perform this task when you want to use an existing VLAN with a VXLAN tunnel that disaggregates traffic based on the inner header of the packet (hardware-disaggregated or DAG tunnel).
  1. On the Main tab, click
    Network
    VLANs
    .
    The VLAN List screen opens.
  2. In the Name column, click the relevant VLAN name.
    This displays the properties of the VLAN.
  3. From the
    DAG tunnel
    list, select
    Inner
    .
    This disaggregates encapsulated packets based on the inner headers.
  4. Click
    Finished
    .

Task summary for configuring VXLAN

Before you configure VXLAN, ensure that these conditions are met:
  • The system must be licensed for SDN Services.
  • Network connectivity exists between the BIG-IP system and the hypervisors.
  • If you have over 2000 tunnels, the
    Management (MGMT)
    setting on the Resource Provisioning screen is set to
    Large
    (
    System
    Resource Provisioning
    ).

Specifying a port number

Before you perform this task, confirm that you have enabled the
DAG Tunnel
setting on the relevant VLAN.
When you enable the DAG tunnel feature on a VLAN, you must also configure a
bigdb
variable that specifies a port number so that associated tunnels can disaggregate based on the inner header of a packet.
  1. Open the TMOS Shell (
    tmsh
    ).
    tmsh
  2. Specify a port number to be used.
    modify sys db iptunnel.vxlan.udpport
    value
    <
    port_number
    >
    The value that you specify with this
    bigdb
    variable applies to all VLANs on which the
    DAG Tunnel
    setting is enabled.
    Typically, a tunnel uses port 4789. If you choose to use a different port number, you must ensure that the port number specified in the relevant VXLAN profile matches the value you set with this command.

Creating a multicast VXLAN tunnel

Creating a VXLAN multicast tunnel on a BIG-IP system provides an L2 VXLAN gateway to connect the physical network with a virtualized network.
  1. On the Main tab, click
    Network
    Tunnels
    Tunnel List
    Create
    or
    Carrier Grade NAT
    Tunnels
    Create
    .
    The New Tunnel screen opens.
  2. In the
    Name
    field, type a unique name for the tunnel.
  3. From the
    Profile
    list, select
    vxlan
    .
    This setting tells the system which tunnel profile to use. The system-supplied VXLAN profile specifies port
    4789
    . To change the port number, you can create a new VXLAN profile, which then appears in this list.
  4. In the
    Local Address
    field, type the self IP address of the VLAN through which the remote hypervisor is reachable.
  5. In the
    Remote Address
    field, type the multicast group address associated with the VXLAN segment.
  6. For the
    Mode
    list, retain the default selection,
    Bidirectional
    .
  7. In the
    MTU
    field, type the maximum transmission unit of the tunnel.
    The default value is
    0
    . The valid range is from
    0
    to
    65515
    .
  8. For the
    Use PMTU
    (Path MTU) setting, select or clear the check box.
    • If enabled and the tunnel MTU is set to
      0
      , the tunnel will use the PMTU information.
    • If enabled and the tunnel MTU is fixed to a non-zero value, the tunnel will use the minimum of PMTU and MTU.
    • If disabled, the tunnel will use fixed MTU or calculate its MTU using tunnel encapsulation configurations
    .
  9. From the
    TOS
    list, select
    Preserve
    , or select
    Specify
    and type a Type of Service (TOS) value.
    The valid range is from
    0
    to
    255
    .
  10. From the
    Auto-Last Hop
    list, select a value.
    • Choose
      Default
      if you want the system to use the global
      Auto Last Hop
      setting (if enabled).
    • Choose
      Enabled
      if you want this setting to take precedence over the global
      Auto Last Hop
      setting, for this tunnel only.
    • Choose
      Disabled
      if you want to disable auto last hop behavior for this tunnel only.
  11. From the
    Traffic Group
    list, select the traffic group that includes the local IP address for the tunnel.
  12. Click
    Finished
    .

Creating a bridge between VXLAN and non-VXLAN networks

Before you begin this task, verify that a VXLAN multicast tunnel exists on the BIG-IP system.
You can create a VLAN group to bridge the traffic between a VXLAN overlay network (Layer 3) and a non-VXLAN (Layer 2) network.
  1. On the Main tab, click
    Network
    VLANs
    VLAN Groups
    .
    The VLAN Groups list screen opens.
  2. Click
    Create
    .
    The New VLAN Group screen opens.
  3. In the
    Name
    field, type a unique name for the VLAN group.
  4. For the
    VLANs
    setting, select the VLAN that connects to the non-VXLAN Layer-2 network and the VXLAN tunnel you created, and using the Move button (
    <<
    ), move your selections from the
    Available
    list to the
    Members
    list.
  5. Click
    Finished
    .

About configuring VXLAN tunnels on high availability BIG-IP device pairs

By default, the BIG-IP system synchronizes all existing tunnel objects in its config sync operation. This operation requires that the local IP address of a tunnel be set to a floating self IP address. In a high availabilty (HA) configuration, any tunnel with a floating local IP address would be available only on the active device, which would prevent some features, such as health monitors, from using the tunnel on the standby device. To make a tunnel available on both the active and standby devices, you need to set the local IP address to a non-floating self IP address, which then requires that you exclude tunnels from the config sync operation. To disable the synchronization of tunnel objects, you can set a
bigdb
variable on both devices.

Disabling config sync for tunnels

In certain cases, you might want to disable config sync behavior for tunnels, such as when you need to make VXLAN tunnels functional on all devices in a BIG-IP device group configured for high availability. The tunnel config sync setting applies to all tunnels created on the BIG-IP device.
Disable config sync on both the active and standby devices before you create any tunnels.
  1. Log in to the
    tmsh
    command-line utility for the BIG-IP system.
  2. Determine whether the variable is already disabled, by typing this command.
    tmsh list sys db iptunnel.configsync value
  3. Disable the variable.
    tmsh modify sys db iptunnel.configsync value disable
  4. Save the configuration.
    tmsh save sys config
  5. F5 recommends that you reboot both the active and standby devices.
Now you can create tunnels with non-floating local IP addresses on both the active and standby devices.

About configuring VXLAN tunnels using OVSDB

The BIG-IP system can create and delete VXLAN tunnels in an overlay segment using the Open vSwitch Database (OVSDB) management protocol. The system does this by communicating with a software-defined networking (SDN) controller that supports OVSDB.
The BIG-IP OVSDB management component includes support for the Bidirectional Forwarding Detection protocol (BFD). With this protocol, the system can detect the failure of an active service node and remove the node from the hash algorithm that is used for forwarding broadcast packets.
For certain SDN controllers, you can use an orchestration plug-in to manage the creation and deletion of the VXLAN tunnels.
Once the plug-in creates the tunnel object, the OVSDB BIG-IP component creates and maintains any necessary L2 and L3 objects as directed by the SDN controller.

Setting up the OVSDB management component

You can configure the BIG-IP system's OVSDB management component, using the BIG-IP Configuration utility. With this component, the system can communicate with one or more OVSDB-capable software-defined networking (SDN) controllers to receive information for configuring VXLAN tunnel endpoints in an overlay segment.
  1. On the Main tab, click
    System
    Configuration
    OVSDB
    .
  2. From the
    OVSDB
    list, select
    Enable
    .
  3. In the
    Controller Addresses
    field, type an OVSDB-capable controller IP address, and click
    Add
    .
    Controller addresses can be in either IPv4 or IPv6 format. If you specify IPv6 addresses, confirm that an IPv6 management address is also configured on the BIG-IP system.
    If the BIG-IP system is communicating with a controller cluster, repeat this step for each controller IP address.
  4. From the
    Flooding Type
    list, select the flooding mechanism to be used to process unknown frames.
    Replicator
    When you select this option, the BIG-IP system uses the default VXLAN profile
    /Common/vxlan-ovsdb
    to create VXLAN tunnels. In this case, the system sends unknown frames to a replicator.
    For some SDN controllers, this option is not supported.
    Multipoint
    When you select this option, the BIG-IP system uses the default VXLAN profile
    /Common/vxlan-ovsdb-multipoint
    to create VXLAN tunnels. In this case, the system sends a copy of the frame in a unicast VXLAN packet to every remote VTEP.
    For some SDN controllers, this option is not supported.
  5. From the
    Logical Routing Type
    list, select whether you want the BIG-IP system to use logical routing.
    None
    Select this option if no logical routing is to be used.
    Backhaul
    Select this option to use backhaul logical routing.
    Before you can use backhaul logical routing, you must enable the BIG-IP system DB variable
    config.allow.rfc3927
    . To do this, log in to the BIG-IP system and access the TMSH shell, and then type the command
    modify sys db config.allow.rfc3927 value enable
    .
  6. In the
    Port
    field, type the controller's port or retain the default.
  7. In the
    Tunnel Local Address
    field, type the IP address of the local endpoint of the tunnel.
    The OVSDB management component uses this setting to configure the non-floating local address of the tunnels. This value can be either an IPv4 or IPv6 address.
  8. If the BIG-IP device is a member of a Device Service Cluster (DSC) Sync-Failover device group and the tunnels need to have a floating address, then for the
    Tunnel Floating Addresses
    setting, in the
    Available
    box, select , one or more floating self IP addresses and move the addresses to the
    Selected
    box.
    The SDN controller uses the DSC traffic groups that contain the selected self IP addresses to populate physical switch records in the OVSDB database. The
    Tunnel Floating Addresses
    setting appears only on devices that are in DSC configurations.
  9. For the
    Tunnel Maintenance Mode
    , select whether you want the BIG-IP system to create VXLAN tunnels automatically.
    Active
    The BIG-IP system creates VXLAN tunnels automatically.
    Passive
    An orchestration plug-in is responsible for maintaining the VXLAN tunnel objects in the BIG-IP system. The OVSDB component will still maintain the necessary Layer 2 and Layer 3 objects as directed by the SDN controller.
  10. From the
    Log Level
    list, select the level of detail you want to display in the log file used for troubleshooting,
    /var/tmp/vxland.out
    .
  11. Configure the SSL certificate settings:
    1. From the
      Certificate File
      list, select a certificate file to be presented to the controller.
    2. From the
      Certificate Key File
      list, select the certificate key file that has the private key.
    3. From the
      CA Certificate File
      list, select the CA certificate file.
      This is the file containing the CA certificate used to validate the certificates presented by the controller.
  12. From the
    Bidirectional Forwarding Detection
    list, select
    Enable
    or
    Disable
    .
    If you select
    Enable
    , the
    Route Domain
    setting appears.
  13. If you chose
    Enable
    in the previous step, then from the
    Route Domain
    list, select the name of a route domain.
    To use this setting, you must have at least one route domain defined on the system in addition to route domain
    0
    .
  14. Click
    Update
    .

About configuring VXLAN-GPE tunnels

You can configure a VXLAN Generic Protocol Extension (GPE) tunnel when you want to add fields to the VXLAN header. One of these fields is
Next Protocol
, with values for Ethernet, IPv4, IPv6, and Network Service Header (NSH).

Creating a multicast VXLAN-GPE tunnel

Creating a VXLAN Generic Protocol Extension (GPE) multicast tunnel on a BIG-IP system provides an L2 VXLAN gateway to connect the physical network with a virtualized network. Unlike a standard VXLAN tunnel, this tunnel type supports the processing of VXLAN GPE-encapsulated Ethernet frames.
  1. On the Main tab, click
    Network
    Tunnels
    Tunnel List
    Create
    or
    Carrier Grade NAT
    Tunnels
    Create
    .
    The New Tunnel screen opens.
  2. In the
    Name
    field, type a unique name for the tunnel.
  3. From the
    Profile
    list, select
    vxlan-gpe
    .
    This setting tells the system which tunnel profile to use. The system-supplied
    vxlan-gpe
    profile specifies port
    4790
    . To change the port number, you can create a new VXLAN-GPE profile, which then appears in this list.
  4. In the
    Local Address
    field, type the self IP address of the VLAN through which the remote hypervisor is reachable.
  5. In the
    Remote Address
    field, select
    Any
    , or select
    Specify
    and type the multicast group address associated with the VXLAN-GPE segment.
  6. For the
    Mode
    list, retain the default selection,
    Bidirectional
    .
  7. In the
    MTU
    field, type the maximum transmission unit of the tunnel.
    The default value is
    0
    . The valid range is from
    0
    to
    65515
    .
  8. For the
    Use PMTU
    (Path MTU) setting, select or clear the check box.
    • If enabled and the tunnel MTU is set to
      0
      , the tunnel will use the PMTU information.
    • If enabled and the tunnel MTU is fixed to a non-zero value, the tunnel will use the minimum of PMTU and MTU.
    • If disabled, the tunnel will use fixed MTU or calculate its MTU using tunnel encapsulation configurations
    .
  9. From the
    TOS
    list, select
    Preserve
    , or select
    Specify
    and type a Type of Service (TOS) value.
    The valid range is from
    0
    to
    255
    .
  10. From the
    Auto-Last Hop
    list, select a value.
    • Choose
      Default
      if you want the system to use the global
      Auto Last Hop
      setting (if enabled).
    • Choose
      Enabled
      if you want this setting to take precedence over the global
      Auto Last Hop
      setting, for this tunnel only.
    • Choose
      Disabled
      if you want to disable auto last hop behavior for this tunnel only.
  11. From the
    Traffic Group
    list, select the traffic group that includes the local IP address for the tunnel.
  12. Click
    Finished
    .