Manual Chapter : Install/Upgrade Software

Applies To:

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F5OS

  • 1.0.0
Manual Chapter

Install/Upgrade Software

Overview: Installation and upgrade options

There are two types of installation/upgrade options for F5OS software:
  • System upgrade installation
  • Clean (or bare metal) installation

System upgrade installation

A system upgrade preserves old image and configuration data and includes these three sub-types:
ISO upgrade
Upgrades both the operating system (os) and services for the system controller or chassis partitions.
Partial upgrade
Upgrades os or services for system controllers or partitions only. The partial update os file has a .os extension and service file has a .img extension. You import partial upgrade files by using either the
system import
command or by using SCP to copy files to the active system controller at the
/var/export/chassis/import/os
or
/var/export/chassis/import/services
directories respectively.
Patch upgrade
Upgrades or patches a subset of system controller or partition services. The patch file has a .patch extension. You import patch upgrade files by using either the
system import
command or by using SCP to copy files to the active system controller at the
/var/export/chassis/import/services
directory.

Clean installation

A clean installation reformats the disk of specific components (system controller or blade) and restores the system to factory defaults.
Formatting erases all data on your system.
For information on configuring your VELOS system after you complete a software installation or upgrade, see
VELOS Systems: Administration and Configuration
at support.f5.com.

Overview: System upgrade installation

You perform a system upgrade of F5OS software when you want to upgrade your system controller or chassis partition software with a point release or engineering hot fix. This installation method reboots the blade automatically when installation completes.

Upgrade F5OS software on a system controller

Verify that you have downloaded and imported the F5OS image files from F5 before you attempt to upgrade.
You can upgrade F5OS software on a system controller using the command-line interface (CLI).
  1. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  2. Log in using the admin account.
    su admin
    The default login credentials are admin/admin. When logging in as admin for the first time, the system prompts you to change the password.
  3. Verify that the image you want to install is listed, and the status is
    ready
    .
    show image
    This verifies that the ISO is imported properly to the image server on the system controllers, and the system controllers can access these images when the blade reboots.
    A summary similar to this excerpt displays:
    VERSION VERSION OS IN SERVICE NUMBER CONTROLLER CONTROLLER STATUS DATE USE CONTROLLER -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 1.0.0-11948 1 ready 2020-10-20 true 1.0.0-11810 1 ready 2020-10-16 false 1.0.0-11948
  4. Change to config mode.
    config
    The CLI prompt changes to include
    (config)
    .
  5. Set the ISO version to the new version.
    system image config iso-version <
    version
    >
  6. Commit the configuration changes.
    commit
Both system controllers install the upgrade and reboot to the new version. This might result in a service outage.

Upgrade F5OS software on a chassis partition

Verify that you have downloaded and imported the F5OS image files from F5 before you attempt to upgrade.
You can upgrade F5OS software on a chassis partition using the command-line interface (CLI).
  1. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  2. Log in using the admin account.
    su admin
    The default login credentials are admin/admin. When logging in as admin for the first time, the system prompts you to change the password.
  3. Verify that the image you want to install is listed, and the status is
    ready
    .
    show image partition state
    This verifies that the ISO is imported properly to the image server on the system controllers, and the system controllers can access these images when the reboots. The imported file replicates automatically to the standby controller.
    A summary similar to this excerpt displays:
    VERSION OS IN NUMBER PARTITION CONTROLLER STATUS DATE USE NAME ID ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 1.0.0-11948 1 ready 2020-10-20 false 1.0.0-11810 1 ready 2020-10-16 true second 2 third 3
  4. Change to config mode.
    config
    The CLI prompt changes to include
    (config)
    .
  5. Set the iso version for the partition so that its member blades are upgraded.
    partitions partition <
    name
    > config iso-version <
    version
    >
  6. Commit the configuration changes.
    commit
The upgraded components activate on the chassis partition. The blades might reboot, depending on the changes in the install. This might result in a service outage.

Overview: Clean installation

You perform a clean installation of F5OS software when you want to start from scratch or when the system is not recoverable. This installation method requires you to use either the built-in VELOS PXE server or a USB flash drive.
Performing a clean installation destroys all information on your system.
Before performing a clean installation of F5OS software on your VELOS system, you must meet these prerequisites:
  • Be able to access the system controller console
  • Have root account access

Clean installation using the PXE server

When you perform a clean installation of F5OS software on your system, the installation uses an built-in PXE server on the system controllers.
This method requires that at least one system controller in your chassis is fully functioning.

Install F5OS software on a system controller using the PXE server

Before you install using the built-in PXE server on the system controllers, be sure to use the
file import
command to import the F5OS software image files to the
/var/import/staging/
directory on your system controllers.
You can use the built-in PXE server on the system controllers to perform a clean installation of F5OS software onto the system controllers using the command-line interface (CLI). For PXE installs of system controllers, you can boot one system controller off the peer controller for recovery purposes.
  1. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  2. Log in as the root user.
    The default login credentials are root/default. When logging in as root for the first time, the system prompts you to change the password.
  3. Reboot the system controller.
    reboot
  4. Intercept the boot by typing
    b
    at the BIOS setup screen.
  5. Select a PXE server and press Enter.
    The installation proceeds automatically.
When the installation completes, the system restarts automatically and synchronizes the standby system controller with the active one.

Install F5OS software on a blade using the PXE server

Before you install using the built-in PXE server on the system controllers, be sure to use the
file import
command to import the F5OS software image files to the
/var/import/staging/
directory on your system controllers.
You use the built-in PXE server on the system controllers to perform a clean installation of F5OS software onto a blade using the command-line interface (CLI).
  1. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  2. Log in to the command line interface (CLI) of the chassis partition using an account with admin access.
    When you log in to the system, you are in user mode.
  3. Verify that the default partition is running.
    show partitions partition default
  4. Reboot the blade.
    reboot
  5. Connect to the blade console.
    In this example,
    x
    is the blade number from 1-
    8
    :
    ssh admin@localhost -p 700
    x
  6. Intercept the boot by typing
    b
    at the BIOS setup screen, and then select one of the listed PXE servers (there is one each system controller.
    The installation proceeds automatically.
When the installation completes, the system restarts automatically.
After you have completed the installation, you can change which image version is running on your partitions. For more information, see the Change the image version running on a partition using the CLI section.

Clean installation using a USB flash drive

When you perform a clean installation of F5OS software on your system using a USB flash drive, you must first enable the front panel USB port on your system controller.
For security purposes, the USB port on the system controller is disabled by default. You can use Always-On Management (AOM) to enable the front panel USB port. For more information, see
Platform Guide: VELOS CX Series
at support.f5.com.

Create a bootable USB flash drive

Before you create a bootable USB flash drive, be sure that you have copied the ISO images to
/var/import/staging/
on your system controller and enabled the front-panel USB port on your system controller using Always-On Management (AOM). For more information, see
Platform Guide: VELOS CX Series
at support.f5.com.
You can create a bootable USB flash drive that contains a VELOS software ISO image using an existing VELOS system.
The USB port on the system controller is disabled by default, so if you want to use this USB flash drive method, you must first enable the USB port.
  1. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  2. Log in as the root user.
    The default login credentials are root/default. When logging in as root for the first time, the system prompts you to change the password.
  3. Write the controller or partition ISOs to a USB flash drive.
    mount <iso_image_name> /mnt sh -x /mnt/usb.sh
    This command sequence writes the ISO image to the flash drive. The flash drive creation process might take several minutes.
You can now use this USB flash drive to boot VELOS systems, as needed.

Install F5OS software on a system controller using a USB flash drive

You can use a USB flash drive to perform a clean installation of F5OS software onto the system controllers using the command-line interface (CLI).
  1. Plug the USB flash drive into the USB port for the system controller that you are installing onto.
  2. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  3. Log in as the root user.
    The default login credentials are root/default. When logging in as root for the first time, the system prompts you to change the password.
  4. Reboot the system controller.
    reboot
  5. Intercept the boot by typing
    b
    at the BIOS setup screen, and then select the USB flash drive that you created.
  6. From the Installer menu, select
    Install Velocity
    .
    The installation proceeds automatically.
When the installation completes, you can remove the USB flash drive and reboot into the Host OS. (Or does it reboot automatically?)

Install F5OS software on a blade using a USB flash drive

You can use a USB flash drive to perform a clean installation of F5OS software onto a blade using the command-line interface (CLI).
  1. Connect to a management console or console server.
    The default baud rate and serial port configuration is 19200/8-N-1.
  2. Log in to the command line interface (CLI) of the blade using an account with root access.
    When logging in as root for the first time, the system prompts you to change the password.
  3. Reboot the blade.
    reboot
  4. Intercept the boot by typing
    b
    at the BIOS setup screen, and then select the USB flash drive that you created.
  5. From the Installer menu, select
    Install Velocity
    .
    The installation proceeds automatically. When the installation completes, you are prompted to confirm a reboot of the system.
After you have completed the installation, you can change which image version is running on your partitions. For more information, see the Change the image version running on a partition using the CLI section.

Overview: Tenant software upgrade installation

To upgrade tenant software, you must log into the tenant using the web-based management interface or command line interface (CLI), upload the updated software version, and then perform the upgrade inside the tenant.
VELOS Series systems support running these tenants, for which the installation files are available as .bundle images:
  • BIG-IP version 14.1.3
For more information about BIG-IP software, see the BIG-IP LTM Knowledge Center.

Tenant images

Following are the four different Classic BIG-IP tenant images that you can deploy in VELOS partitions:
  • T1-VELOS: BIGIP-bigip1x.x.x-miro-1x.x.x.x-x.x.xxx.T2-VELOS.qcow2.zip.bundle
  • T2-VELOS: BIGIP-bigip1x.x.x-miro-1x.x.x.x-x.x.xxx.T1-VELOS.qcow2.zip.bundle
  • ALL-VELOS: BIGIP-bigip1x.x.x-miro-1x.x.x.x-x.x.xxx.ALL-VELOS.qcow2.zip.bundle
  • T4-VELOS: BIGIP-bigip1x.x.x-miro-1x.x.x.x-x.x.xxx.T4-VELOS.qcow2.zip.bundle
Each image type has different uses so you need to be sure to use the correct type for tenant needs. Here are the general use cases. Note that T1-VELOS has limitations so using the other images is recommended. Other images must be downloaded from the downloads site.
Tenant Usage
Tenant image
Description of Use
T1-VELOS
  • Use case: Need maximum tenant density, maximum tenants per blade
  • Supports lightweight LTM or GTM only (also called micro-instance)
  • Requires 1 slot
  • You cannot upgrade or apply a hotfix to the system
T2-VELOS
  • Use case: Need maximum tenant density, maximum tenants per blade
  • Supports provisioning LTM or GTM only
  • Requires 2 slots
  • Live-upgradable
ALL-VELOS
  • Use case: Need multi-tenancy, multi-module, and service chaining
  • Supports provisioning all modules (also called all-instance image)
  • Requires minimum 2 slots
  • Live-upgradable
T4-VELOS
  • Use case: Super-VIP scenario (virtual IP that spans multiple blades), single tenant with multiple modules
  • Supports provisioning all modules with increased capacity
  • Requires minimum 2 slots
  • Live-upgradable
Each of the images has different sizing requirements. You will need to understand the size of the partition and the tenant requirements to determine the number and type of tenants you can deploy. The amount of memory and disk space that a tenant actually needs is dependent on the number of modules provisioned and its use.
Tenant sizing
Tenant image
Disk size
Minimum memory
Minimum # vCPUs
Max tenants per blade
T1-VELOS
22GB
4GB
1
22
T2-VELOS
45GB
8GB
2
11
ALL-VELOS
76GB
8GB
2
9
T4-VELOS
142GB
8GB
2
4

Create and deploy tenants from the CLI

Before you get started, import the tenant images you want to use for the tenant deployments. You need to know into which partition you want to deploy the tenant. VLANs need to have been previously created in the chassis partition. Before you can create and deploy tenants, you also need to estimate resource requirements so you know how many vCPUs, memory, and so on to assign to the tenant.
You can create and deploy tenants in a chassis partition.
  1. Log in to the command line interface (CLI) of the chassis partition using an account with admin access.
    When you log in to the system, you are in user mode.
  2. Change to config mode.
    config
    The CLI prompt changes to include
    (config)
    .
  3. Create and deploy the tenant.
    The first character in the name cannot be a number. After that, only lowercase alphanumeric characters and hyphens are allowed; name length 1-50 characters.
    tenants tenant
    <name>
    config
    <options>
    where
    <options>
    can be any of the following:
    Possible completions: appliance-mode Enable or disable root and bash access for the tenant. cryptos Enable or disable crypto device support for the tenant. gateway User-specified gateway for the tenant mgmt-ip. image User-specified image for tenant. memory User-specified memory in MBs for the tenant. mgmt-ip User-specified mgmt-ip for tenant management access. name User-specified name for the tenant. nodes User-specified node-numbers in the partition to schedule the tenant. prefix-length User-specified prefix-length for the tenant mgmt-ip. running-state User-specified state for the tenant: configured, provisioned, or deployed. type Tenant type. BIG-IP is the default value. vcpu-cores-per-node User-specified number of logical CPU cores for the tenant. vlans User-specified vlan-id from partition VLAN table for the tenant.
    This example creates a Classic BIG-IP tenant called
    mercury-vm
    that spans 4 nodes, and will be put into the configured running state, by default:
    tenants tenant mercury-vm config type BIG-IP image BIGIP-bigip14.1.x-miro-14.1.2.8-0.0.455.ALL-VELOS.qcow2.zip.bundle mgmt-ip 10.255.0.205 prefix-length 24 gateway 10.255.0.1 nodes [ 1 2 3 4 ]
  4. Commit the configuration changes.
    commit
  5. You can monitor the operational state of the tenant and move the tenant into the provisioned state, which causes the system to assign the tenant to nodes, and create virtual disks for the tenant on those nodes.
    tenants tenant mercury-vm config running-state provisioned
    When the system is creating the virtual disk and installing the image on disk, the operational state of the tenant shows this information:
    • PHASE – Allocating resources to the tenant is in progress
    • status – Provisioning
    partition1# show tenants tenant mercury-vm tenants tenant mercury-vm state name mercury-vm state type BIG-IP state mgmt-ip 10.255.0.205 state prefix-length 24 state gateway 10.255.0.1 state cryptos disabled state vcpu-cores-per-node 2 state memory 7680 state running-state deployed state mac-data mgmt-mac 00:0a:49:ff:20:0c state mac-data base-mac 00:0a:49:ff:20:0d state mac-data mac-pool-size 1 state appliance-mode disabled state status Provisioning INSTANCE NODE ID PHASE 1 1 Allocating resources to tenant is in progress ... 2 2 Allocating resources to tenant is in progress ... 3 3 Allocating resources to tenant is in progress ... 4 4 Allocating resources to tenant is in progress ...
    When the system completes the virtual disk creation, the operational state displays:
    • PHASE – Ready to deploy
    • status – Provisioned
    partition1# show tenants tenant mercury-vm tenants tenant mercury-vm state name mercury-vm state type BIG-IP state mgmt-ip 10.255.0.205 state prefix-length 24 state gateway 10.255.0.1 state cryptos disabled state vcpu-cores-per-node 2 state memory 7680 state running-state deployed state mac-data mgmt-mac 00:0a:49:ff:20:0c state mac-data base-mac 00:0a:49:ff:20:0d state mac-data mac-pool-size 1 state appliance-mode disabled state status Provisioned INSTANCE NODE ID PHASE --------------------------------- 1 1 Ready to deploy ... 2 2 Ready to deploy ... 3 3 Ready to deploy ... 4 4 Ready to deploy ...
  6. You can then deploy the tenant.
    tenants tenant mercury-vm config running-state deployed
    This example moves the tenant into the deployed state, which causes the system to start and maintain VMs on each node that the tenant is assigned to.
  7. Commit the configuration changes.
    commit
  8. You can check the status of the tenant.
    show tenants tenant mercury-vm state instances
    INSTANCE NODE ID PHASE IMAGE NAME ... STATUS -------------------------------------------------------------------- 1 1 Running BIGIP-bigip14.1.... Started tenant instance 2 2 Running BIGIP-bigip14.1.... Started tenant instance
  9. Return to user mode.
    end
Once you configure and deploy the tenant, you can use the management IP address to access the BIG-IP system using SSH, webUI, and TMOS Shell (
tmsh
).